Eddie Lang - Sessions


1917  |  1919  |  1923  |  1924  |  1925  |  1926  |  1933


Eddie Lang - Sessions - 1917


1917 Sessions

ca. 1917-1918: Joe Venuti & Eddie Lang (violin and guitar recordings)
"(recorded) about 20 cylinders of Italian popular music for Edison Bell, published in 64,000 series" (as per Joe Venuti).
Source: Eddie Lang: Stringin' The Blues, by Adriano Mazzoletti (Rome, Italy, Pantheon Editore, 1997).
Note: Part of Venuti folklore, these recordings, if they ever existed, have failed to turn up. (mp, 2010)


Eddie Lang - Sessions - 1919


1919 Sessions

ca. 1919-1920: Joe Venuti & Eddie Lang (violin and guitar recordings)
"(recorded) about 50 sides of Italian popular music for Edison Bell, published in 64,000 series" (as per Joe Venuti).
Source: Eddie Lang: Stringin' The Blues, by Adriano Mazzoletti (Rome, Italy, Pantheon Editore, 1997).
Note: Part of Venuti folklore, these recordings, if they ever existed, have failed to turn up. (mp, 2010)


Eddie Lang - Sessions - 1923


1923 Sessions

Charlie Kerr's Orchestra
Thursday, March 8, 1923
Edison Record Co., New York City

Orchestra including Eddie Lang (banjo)
8872-A Good Morning, Dearie - Edison 51070-R
8872-B Good Morning, Dearie - Edison 51070-R (metal part exists)
8872-C Good Morning, Dearie - Edison 51070-R (banjo breaks)
8873-A A Silver Canoe - Edison 51070-L (metal part exists)
8873-B A Silver Canoe - Edison 51070-L (banjo rhythm)
8873-C A Silver Canoe - Edison 51070-L
Source: ARSC Lifetime Achievement Award recipient, and noted Edison authority; Raymond Wile, and Jerry Fabris; audio curator at Edison National Historic Site, West Orange, New Jersey.

Charlie Kerr's Orchestra
Tuesday, April 3, 1923
Edison Record Co., New York City

Orchestra including Eddie Lang (banjo)
8903-C In A Caravan - Edison 51147-R (metal part exists)
8904-B Gone! (But Still In My Heart) - Edison 51147-L (metal part exists)
8904-C Gone! (But Still In My Heart) - Edison 51147-L (banjo solo)
Source: ARSC Lifetime Achievement Award recipient, and noted Edison authority; Raymond Wile, and Jerry Fabris; audio curator at Edison National Historic Site, West Orange, New Jersey.

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Charlie Kerr's Orchestra
Thursday, April 26, 1923
Edison Record Co., New York City

Orchestra including Eddie Lang (banjo)
8944-A No One Loves You Any Better Than Your M-A-Double-M-Y - Edison 51164-R
8944-B No One Loves You Any Better Than Your M-A-Double-M-Y - Edison 51164-R (banjo)
8944-C No One Loves You Any Better Than Your M-A-Double-M-Y - Edison 51164-R (metal part exists)
8945-B Mad - Edison 51167
8945-C Mad - Edison 51167 (metal part exists)
Source: ARSC Lifetime Achievement Award recipient, and noted Edison authority; Raymond Wile, and Jerry Fabris; audio curator at Edison National Historic Site, West Orange, New Jersey.

Charlie Kerr's Orchestra
Wednesday, June 27, 1923
Edison Record Co., New York City

Orchestra including Eddie Lang (banjo)
9048-A My Sweetie Went Away - Edison 51194-R
9048-B My Sweetie Went Away - Edison 51194-R
9048-C My Sweetie Went Away - Edison 51194-R (metal part exists)
9049-A Ophelia - Edison 51194-L (banjo breaks)
9049-B Ophelia - Edison 51194-L (banjo breaks)
9049-C Ophelia - Edison 51194-L (metal part exists)
Source: ARSC Lifetime Achievement Award recipient, and noted Edison authority; Raymond Wile, and Jerry Fabris; audio curator at Edison National Historic Site, West Orange, New Jersey.

Charlie Kerr And His Orchestra
Thursday, October 25, 1923
Edison Record Co., New York City

Orchestra including Eddie Lang (banjo)
9222-A Operatic Melodies - Edison unissued (Test exists: ED1154)
9222-B Operatic Melodies - Edison unissued (Test exists: ED1153)
9222-C Operatic Melodies - Edison unissued (Test exists: ED1152)
9223-A Open Your Heart - Edison 51265 (banjo breaks)
9223-B Open Your Heart - Edison 51265
9223-C Open Your Heart - Edison 51265 (metal part exists)
Source: ARSC Lifetime Achievement Award recipient, and noted Edison authority; Raymond Wile, and Jerry Fabris; audio curator at Edison National Historic Site, West Orange, New Jersey.

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1917  |  1919  |  1923  |  1924  |  1925  |  1926  |  1933


Eddie Lang - Sessions - 1924


1924 Sessions

Mound City Blue Blowers
Wednesday, December 10, 1924
Brunswick Record Co., New York City

Red McKenzie (comb), Dick Slevin (kazoo), Jack Bland (banjo), Eddie Lang (guitar)
14436/37/38 Tiger Rag - Brunswick 2804 (guitar accompaniment, break)
14439/40/41 Deep Second Street Blues (McCauley-McKenzie-Lang) - Brunswick 2804 (guitar intro, accompaniment, solo)
Note: Up until 1928 Brunswick used a system where a different master was assigned to each “take” (or each version of the selection being recorded). Usually at least two or three “takes” of each title were recorded, although only one “take” may have been selected for issue.(Brunswick Records: A Discography Of Recordings, 1916-1931, Volume 4; Ross Laird, Greenwood Publishing Group, 2001).
Note: Deep Second Street Blues is the first published Lang composition.

McKenzie's Candy Kids
Friday, December 12, 1924
Brunswick Record Co., New York City

Red McKenzie (comb), Dick Slevin (kazoo), Jack Bland (banjo), Eddie Lang (guitar)
286/87/88 When My Sugar Walks Down The Street - Vocalion B 14977 (guitar intro, solo, outro)
289/90/91 Panama - Vocalion A 14977 (guitar accompaniment, break)
Note: Up until 1928 Brunswick used a system where a different master was assigned to each “take” (or each version of the selection being recorded). Usually at least two or three “takes” of each title were recorded, although only one “take” may have been selected for issue.(Brunswick Records: A Discography Of Recordings, 1916-1931, Volume 4; Ross Laird, Greenwood Publishing Group, 2001).

McKenzie's Candy Kids
Friday, December 12, 1924
Brunswick Record Co., New York City

Red McKenzie (comb), Dick Slevin (kazoo), Jack Bland (banjo), Eddie Lang (guitar)
14468/69/70 When My Sugar Walks Down The Street - Brunswick rejected
14471/72/73 Panama - Brunswick rejected

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1917  |  1919  |  1923  |  1924  |  1925  |  1926  |  1933


Eddie Lang - Sessions - 1925


1925 Sessions

Irving Kaufman
Friday, January 23, 1925
Brunswick Record Co., New York City

Orchestra including Eddie Lang (guitar)
260/261/262 Nobody Knows What A Red Head Mama Can Do - Vocalion 14950 (accompaniment)
263/264/265 (Most of all) I Want Your Love - Vocalion 14973
Note: First freelance recording session.
Note: Up until 1928 Brunswick used a system where a different master was assigned to each “take” (or each version of the selection being recorded). Usually at least two or three “takes” of each title were recorded, although only one “take” may have been selected for issue.( Brunswick Records: A Discography Of Recordings, 1916-1931, Volume 4; Ross Laird, Greenwood Publishing Group, 2001).

Irving Kaufman
Saturday, January 24, 1925
Brunswick Record Co., New York City

Orchestra including Eddie Lang (guitar)
266/67/68 I Don't Care What You Used To Be (I Know What You Are Today) - Vocalion 14973
269/70/71 Alabamy Bound - Vocalion 14972
272/73/74 I Don't Want To Get Married I'm Having To Much Fun - Vocalion 14972
Note: Up until 1928 Brunswick used a system where a different master was assigned to each “take” (or each version of the selection being recorded). Usually at least two or three “takes” of each title were recorded, although only one “take” may have been selected for issue.( Brunswick Records: A Discography Of Recordings, 1916-1931, Volume 4; Ross Laird, Greenwood Publishing Group, 2001).

McKenzie's Candy Kids (Mound City Blue Blowers)
Monday, January 26, 1925
Brunswick Record Co., New York City

Red McKenzie (comb), Dick Slevin (kazoo), Harry Reser (banjo), Eddie Lang (guitar)
332/33/34 Best Black - Vocalion 14978 (accompaniment, solo)
335/36/37 Stretch It Boy (Lange-Bland-McKenzie) - Vocalion 14978 (accompaniment, solo)
Note: as January 27, 1925; Jazz Records 1897-1942, Brian Rust, Arlington House, 1978.
Note: Up until 1928 Brunswick used a system where a different master was assigned to each “take” (or each version of the selection being recorded). Usually at least two or three “takes” of each title were recorded, although only one “take” may have been selected for issue.( Brunswick Records: A Discography Of Recordings, 1916-1931, Volume 4; Ross Laird, Greenwood Publishing Group, 2001).

Mound City Blue Blowers
Wednesday, February 4, 1925
Brunswick Record Co., New York City

Red McKenzie (comb), Dick Slevin (kazoo), Jack Bland (banjo), Eddie Lang (guitar)
14806 Gettin’ Told - Brunswick rejected
14807 Play Me Slow - Brunswick rejected

Mound City Blue Blowers
Monday, February 9, 1925
Brunswick Record Co., New York City

Red McKenzie (comb), Dick Slevin (kazoo), Jack Bland (banjo), Eddie Lang (guitar)
14872/73/74 Gettin’ Told (Lange-McKenzie) - Brunswick 2849 (accompaniment, break)
14875/76 Play Me Slow - Brunswick 2849 (accompaniment, break)
Note: Up until 1928 Brunswick used a system where a different master was assigned to each “take” (or each version of the selection being recorded). Usually at least two or three “takes” of each title were recorded, although only one “take” may have been selected for issue.( Brunswick Records: A Discography Of Recordings, 1916-1931, Volume 4; Ross Laird, Greenwood Publishing Group, 2001).

McKenzie's Candy Kids (Mound City Blue Blowers)
Tuesday, March 24, 1925
Brunswick Record Co., New York City

Red McKenzie (comb), Dick Slevin (kazoo), Jack Bland (banjo), Eddie Lang (guitar)
596/97/98 Wigwam Blues - Vocalion rejected

Mound City Blue Blowers
Tuesday, March 24, 1925
Brunswick Record Co., New York City

Red McKenzie (comb), Dick Slevin (kazoo), Jack Bland (banjo), Eddie Lang (guitar)
15774/75/76 Wigwam Blues - Brunswick 2908 (intro, accompaniment)
Note: Up until 1928 Brunswick used a system where a different master was assigned to each “take” (or each version of the selection being recorded). Usually at least two or three “takes” of each title were recorded, although only one “take” may have been selected for issue.( Brunswick Records: A Discography Of Recordings, 1916-1931, Volume 4; Ross Laird, Greenwood Publishing Group, 2001).

Mound City Blue Blowers
Wednesday, March 25, 1925
Brunswick Record Co., New York City

Red McKenzie (comb), Dick Slevin (kazoo), Jack Bland (banjo), Eddie Lang (guitar)
15777/78/79 Blues In F - Brunswick 2908 (intro, accompaniment, solo) (McKenzie-Lang)
Note: Up until 1928 Brunswick used a system where a different master was assigned to each “take” (or each version of the selection being recorded). Usually at least two or three “takes” of each title were recorded, although only one “take” may have been selected for issue.( Brunswick Records: A Discography Of Recordings, 1916-1931, Volume 4; Ross Laird, Greenwood Publishing Group, 2001).

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McKenzie's Candy Kids (Mound City Blue Blowers)
Wednesday, March 25, 1925
Brunswick Record Co., New York City

Red McKenzie (comb), Dick Slevin (kazoo), Jack Bland (banjo), Eddie Lang (guitar)
611/12/13 Blues In F - Vocalion rejected

Mound City Blue Blowers
April-June, 1925
Brunswick Record Co., London, England

Red McKenzie (comb), Dick Slevin (kazoo), Jack Bland (banjo), Eddie Lang (guitar)
Unknown titles
Note: Eddie Lang, Harry Francis, and record collector Arthur “Nat” Kinnear have all mentioned that recordings were made by the Mound City Blue Blowers while they were in England. These recordings have yet to be uncovered.
Source: "Hello-Rhythm Fiends!" by Eddie Lang, RHYTHM (UK), September, 1932.
Source: As I Was Playing …, Harry Francis, Crescendo, November, 1972.

McKenzie's Candy Kids (Mound City Blue Blowers)
Friday, August 7, 1925
Brunswick Record Co., New York City

Red McKenzie (comb), Dick Slevin (kazoo), Jack Bland (banjo), Eddie Lang (guitar), unknown ukulele*
1067/68/69 The Morning After Blues - Vocalion 15088 (McKenzie-Lange) (intro, accompaniment)*
1070/71 Happy Children Blues - Vocalion 15088 (intro, accompaniment)
Note: Up until 1928 Brunswick used a system where a different master was assigned to each “take” (or each version of the selection being recorded). Usually at least two or three “takes” of each title were recorded, although only one “take” may have been selected for issue.( Brunswick Records: A Discography Of Recordings, 1916-1931, Volume 4; Ross Laird, Greenwood Publishing Group, 2001).

McKenzie's Candy Kids (Mound City Blue Blowers)
Tuesday, September 1, 1925
Brunswick Record Co., New York City

Red McKenzie (comb), Dick Slevin (kazoo), Jack Bland (banjo), Eddie Lang (guitar), unknown banjo*
1642/43/44 Hot Honey - Vocalion 15166 (Lange-McKenzie) (intro, accompaniment, solo)*
1645/46 If You Never Come Back - Vocalion 15166 (accompaniment, solo)
Note: as October 29, 1925; Jazz Records 1897-1942, Brian Rust, Arlington House, 1978.
Note: First Mound City Blue Blowers electrical recording session.
Note: Up until 1928 Brunswick used a system where a different master was assigned to each “take” (or each version of the selection being recorded). Usually at least two or three “takes” of each title were recorded, although only one “take” may have been selected for issue.( Brunswick Records: A Discography Of Recordings, 1916-1931, Volume 4; Ross Laird, Greenwood Publishing Group, 2001).

Mound City Blue Blowers
Thursday, October 8, 1925
Brunswick Record Co., New York City

Red McKenzie (comb), Dick Slevin (kazoo), Jack Bland (banjo), Eddie Lang (guitar)
Unknown Titles - Brunswick Test

Norman Clark
Tuesday, October 20, 1925
Brunswick Record Co., New York City

Norman Clark (vocal), Eddie Lang (guitar)
1517/18/19 Sleepy Time Gal - Vocalion rejected

Norman Clark
Thursday, October 22, 1925
Brunswick Record Co., New York City

Norman Clark (vocal), Eddie Lang (guitar)
1520/21/22/23 The Lonesomest Gal In Town - Vocalion rejected
1530 Sleepy Time Gal - Vocalion rejected

Kerr's Famous Players (Charlie Kerr and His Orchestra)
Thursday, October 22, 1925
Gennett Record Co., New York City

Orchestra including Eddie Lang (guitar, banjo)
9789 Goodbye - Gennett rejected
9790 What Did I Tell Ya! - Gennett rejected

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Ross Gorman’s Earl Carroll Vanities Orchestra
Thursday, October 29, 1925
Columbia Record Co., New York City

Orchestra including Eddie Lang (guitar, banjo*), poss. Dick McDonough (banjo)
141214-3 I’m Sitting On Top Of The World - Columbia 498-D (solo, accompaniment)
141215-2 Rhythm Of The Day - Columbia 498-D (banjo only)*

Peggy English
Friday, November 6, 1925
Brunswick Record Co., New York City

Peggy English (vocal), Eddie Lang (guitar)
1598/1599/1600 Someone’s Stolen My Baby - Vocalion rejected

Norman Clark
Saturday, November 7, 1925
Brunswick Record Co., New York City

Norman Clark (vocal), Eddie Lang (guitar)
1601/02/03/04 Sleepy Time Gal - Vocalion rejected
1605/06/07/08 The Lonesomest Gal In Town - Vocalion rejected

Peggy English
Monday, November 16, 1925
Brunswick Record Co., New York City

Peggy English (vocal), Eddie Lang (guitar)
1724/25/26 Running After You - Vocalion rejected

Norman Clark
Monday, November 16, 1925
Brunswick Record Co., New York City

Norman Clark (vocal), Eddie Lang (guitar)
1727/28/29 Sleepy Time Gal - Vocalion rejected
1730/31 The Lonesomest Gal In Town - Vocalion rejected

Ross Gorman and His Orchestra
Tuesday, November 24, 1925
Columbia Record Co., New York City

Orchestra including Eddie Lang (guitar, banjo?*), poss. Dick McDonough (banjo)
141307-4 I Never Knew - Columbia 516-D (accompaniment, banjo break*)
141308-2 Sleepy Time Gal - Columbia 516-D (obligato to baritone sax)

Bailey's Lucky Seven
Wednesday, December 2, 1925
Gennett Record Co., New York City

Orchestra including Eddie Lang (guitar, banjo)
9871-A Pile Of Logs And Stones - Gennett 3232 (guitar accompaniment, banjo rhythm)
9872-A I Love My Baby (My Baby Loves Me) - Gennett 3204 (banjo only)

Kerr's Famous Players (Charlie Kerr and His Orchestra)
Thursday, December 3, 1925
Gennett Record Co., New York City

Orchestra including Eddie Lang (guitar, banjo)
9889 What Did I Tell Ya! - Gennett 3219-B (banjo rhythm, guitar solo)
9890 Good-Bye - Gennett 3219-A

Norman Clark
Tuesday, December 15, 1925
Brunswick Record Co., New York City

Norman Clark (vocal), Eddie Lang (guitar)
1941/42/43 Sleepy Time Gal - Vocalion 15142 (accompaniment)
1944/45 Lonesomest Girl In Town - Vocalion 15142 (accompaniment)

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1917  |  1919  |  1923  |  1924  |  1925  |  1926  |  1933


Eddie Lang - Sessions - 1926


1926 Sessions

Van’s Collegians
ca. March 5, 1926
Pathe Record Co., New York City

Orchestra poss. including Eddie Lang (banjo)
106690 Jig Walk - Pathe 36422 (banjo)
106691 Whose Who Are You? - Pathe 36432 (banjo fills)
Note: as possibly including Eddie Lang; Jazz Records 1897-1942, Brian Rust, Arlington House, 1978.
Note: Unable to substantiate presence of Eddie Lang.
Note: The score for 106690 (a Duke Ellington composition) contains an eight bar saxophone passage borrowed by Lester Young, from which he wrote “Tickle Toe” (Count Basie, 1940).

We Three
ca. March 22, 1926
Pathe Record Co., New York City

Red Nichols (trumpet), Arthur Schutt (piano), Eddie Lang (guitar*), Vic Berton (drums)
106746 Plenty Off Center - Pathe 36492 (does not include Lang)
106747 Trumpet Sobs - Pathe 36464 (intro, accompaniment, solo)*
Note: as March 24, 1926; Jazz Records 1897-1942, Brian Rust, Arlington House, 1978.

Ross Gorman and His Orchestra
March 24, 1926
Columbia Record Co., New York City

Orchestra including Eddie Lang (guitar), poss. Dick McDonough (banjo)
141860-3 No More Worryin’ - Columbia 615 (solo, break, chord at end)
141861-3 I’d Rather Be The Girl In Your Arms - Columbia 615 (intro, break, solo)

Brillhardt’s Orchestra
ca. April, 1926
Pathe Record Co., New York City

Orchestra including Red Nichols (trumpet), Eddie Lang (guitar, banjo)
106803 The Girl Friend - Pathe 36430 (banjo break)
106804 Hello, Aloha! How Are You? - Pathe 36438 (banjo, guitar)
106805 State Street Shuffle - Pathe 36450 (banjo)

Joe Venuti & Eddie Lang
Wednesday, September 29, 1926
Columbia Record Co., New York City

Joe Venuti (violin), Eddie Lang (guitar)
142697-1,2,3 Stringing The Blues - unissued, master no longer exists
142698-2 Black And Blue Bottom - Columbia 914-D
Note: 142698-3 is listed in discographies, but does not exist.
Note: First Joe Venuti/Eddie Lang copyright.

What better way to begin our listening experience than with the opening strains of Joe Venuti’s violin and Eddie Lang’s guitar playing in harmony. A Venuti-Lang trademark, which they used with great success on numerous recordings, broadcasts and appearances, it sets the tone for this, their premier recording session as co-leaders.
Joe and Eddie were just finishing off the 1926 summer season at Atlantic City’s Silver Slipper Club when they caught the earliest northbound train out of the resort town for New York City. The boys cut things a little to close by attempting to travel 260 miles by rail, make two records, and then return to Atlantic City so as to be on time for a 9 p.m. start at the Silver Slipper Club. There appears to have been some problems from the start of the session possibly due to the rushed schedule. Of the two titles, only “Black And Blue Bottom” was a keeper. They began the session with “Stringing The Blues” but all attempts to record it resulted in three rejected takes. They made another stab at it nearly a month later (October 22) with the same results (four rejected takes).

For two guys steeped in melody, “Black And Blue Bottom” barely contains anything that resembles one. “Bottom” is really an excuse to just “blow”, it’s all Joe with Eddie’s pulsating rhythm behind him. Hear how effortlessly the violinist peels off those harmonic breaks, it takes your breath away. Eddie fills with an exceptionally long series of chords (12 bars) allowing Joe time to wrap his bow around the violin for a final chorus played in four-string fashion. This is the first recording solely performed from start to finish by a violin and guitar in the jazz genre. When it was heard, the music was a revelation.

Satisfied that they had salvaged at least one of the songs, Joe and Eddie picked up lunch and raced back over to Pennsylvania Station to catch an afternoon train to Atlantic City. Once they settled in, out came the pepper sandwiches, sweet and hot sausages, cheese and the vino. It wasn’t long before instrument cases were open and they could be heard serenading the passengers. On the personal side, Eddie proposed to girlfriend Kitty (Rasch) during the weekend and got married in Norwalk, Connecticut a few days later.

Notes by Mike Peters from The Classic Columbia And Okeh Joe Venuti And Eddie Lang Sessions, Mosaic MD8-213 (2002) www.mosaicrecords.com

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Jean Goldkette and His Orchestra
Tuesday, October 12, 1926
Victor Record Co., New York City

Orchestra including Bix Beiderbecke (cornet), Frank Trumbauer (C-melody sax), Joe Venuti (violin), Eddie Lang (guitar)
Time: 1:30pm-5:25pm
36813-1 Idolizing - Victor unissued/re-issue (solo behind vocal, Venuti solo)
36813-2 Idolizing - Victor 20270-B (solo behind vocal, Venuti solo)
Release Date: February 4, 1927
36814-1-2-3-4 I’d Rather Be The Girl In Your Arms - Victor rejected
36815-2 Hush-A-Bye - Victor 20270-A (accompaniment, Venuti/Lang -8-)
Release Date: February 4, 1927
Note: First Venuti/Lang session with Jean Goldkette.
Source: TRAM: The Frank Trumbauer Story, Philip R. Evans & Larry F. Kiner, with William Trumbauer, Studies in Jazz, No. 18, Institute Of Jazz Studies, Rutgers-The State University of New Jersey and Scarecrow Press, Inc. (1994).

Jean Goldkette and His Orchestra
Friday, October 15, 1926
Victor Record Co., New York City

Orchestra including Bix Beiderbecke (cornet), Frank Trumbauer (C-melody sax), Joe Venuti (violin), Eddie Lang (guitar*)
Time: 10.00am-2.30pm
BVE 36814-8 I’d Rather Be The Girl In Your Arms - Victor 20273 (intro -8-, accompaniment, Venuti/Lang -16+7-)*
Release Date: December 3, 1926
36829-2 Sunday - Victor rejected/re-issue (break, accompaniment, Venuti solo)*
36829-3 Sunday - Victor 20273 (break, accompaniment, Venuti solo)*
Release Date: December 3, 1926
Time: 3pm - 5:20pm
BVE 36830-2 Cover Me Up With Sunshine - Victor 20588 (No guitar)
Release Date: May 20, 1927
BVE 36831-2 Just One More Kiss - Victor rejected/reissue (accompaniment)*
BVE 36831-4 Just One More Kiss - Victor 20300 (accompaniment)*
Release Date: November 4, 1926
Source: TRAM: The Frank Trumbauer Story, Philip R. Evans & Larry F. Kiner, with William Trumbauer, Studies in Jazz, No. 18, Institute Of Jazz Studies, Rutgers-The State University of New Jersey and Scarecrow Press, Inc. (1994)

Joe Venuti & Eddie Lang
October 22, 1926
Columbia Record Co., New York City

Joe Venuti (violin), Eddie Lang (guitar)
142697-4,5,6,7 Stringing The Blues - unissued, master no longer exists

Lou Gold and His Orchestra
October 28, 1926
Pathe Recording Co., New York City

Orchestra poss. including Eddie Lang (banjo)
107177 Broken Hearted - Pathe 36549
107178 Hello! Swanee, Hello! - Pathe 36551
107179 Measley Blues - Pathe 36577
107180 My Girl Has Eye Trouble - Pathe 36550
Note: Presumed to include Lang, this recording session has yet to be auditioned to confirm Eddie Lang’s presence.

Ross Gorman and His Orchestra
ca. November, 1926
Cameo Record Co., New York City

Orchestra including Eddie Lang (guitar)
2193 Idolizing - Cameo 1063 (solo -32-, break)
Note: same arrangement as November 3, 1926 Ross Gorman Edison recording.

The Red Heads
ca. November 3, 1926
Pathe Record Co., New York City

Red Nichols (trumpet), Arthur Schutt (piano), Eddie Lang (guitar), Vic Berton (drums)
107192 A Get With - Pathe (E) 11347 (intro, accompaniment)
107193 A Get A Load Of This - Pathe (E) 11347 (Lange-Nichols) (accompaniment, solo)
Note: as November 4, 1926; Jazz Records 1897-1942, Brian Rust, Arlington House, 1978.

Cliff Edwards acc. by his Hot Combination
ca. November 3, 1926
Pathe Record Co., New York City

Cliff Edwards (vocal, ukulele), Red Nichols (trumpet), Jimmy Dorsey (baritone sax), Joe Venuti (violin), Eddie Lang (guitar), Vic Berton (drums)
107194 I'm Tellin’ The Birds, Tellin’ The Bees (How I Love You) - Pathe 25200 (rhythm, solo, break, Venuti four-string solo, Venuti/Lang coda -8-)

Ross Gorman and His Orchestra
Tuesday, November 3, 1926
Edison Record Co., New York City

Orchestra including Red Nichols (trumpet), Eddie Lang (guitar)
11279- You’re Burning Me Up (Turning Me Down) - Edison rejected
11280-B Idolizing - Edison 51876 (metal part for take B @ Edison) (solo -32-)
Note: same arrangement as ca. November, 1926 Ross Gorman Cameo recording.
Source: ARSC Lifetime Achievement Award recipient, and noted Edison authority; Raymond Wile, and Jerry Fabris; audio curator at Edison National Historic Site, West Orange, New Jersey.

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Joe Venuti & Eddie Lang
November 8, 1926
Columbia Record Co., New York City

Joe Venuti (violin), Eddie Lang (guitar)
142697-8 Stringing The Blues - Columbia 914-D
142697-11 Stringing The Blues - Columbia 914-D
By October of 1926, Joe and Eddie had relocated permanently to New York City. Stints on the bandstand and in the recording studio with the orchestras of Jean Goldkette, Roger Wolfe Kahn, Jack Pettis and Ross Gorman heralded their triumphant entrance to the entertainment capitol of the world. “Get me Joe Venuti and Eddie Lang” rang from the mouths of recording studio managers, singers, bandleaders, and the pop music makers of Gotham.
Joe and Eddie scheduled another session (their third) in an attempt to record an acceptable take of “Stringing The Blues”. Of the four recorded, two were deemed acceptable. Whatever problems they encountered previously (takes 1 thru 7 all rejected), Joe and Eddie still seem unsure as to what tempo would best suit the performance. As the session drew to a close they picked up the tempo with positive results. Catch the foot tapping during the breaks, these two guys performed with a thunderous beat which propelled their music.
Not a blues, “Stringing The Blues” is a Venuti-Lang variation on the chords of “Tiger Rag”. As one of the first jazz recordings they heard in 1919-1920 (ODJB), “Tiger Rag” was and remains a staple in the classic jazz repertoire. Coincidentally, it was Django Reinhardt’s favorite vehicle over which to improvise.
Notes by Mike Peters from The Classic Columbia And Okeh Joe Venuti And Eddie Lang Sessions, Mosaic MD8-213 (2002). www.mosaicrecords.com

Jimmy Lytell
ca. November 14, 1926
Pathe Record Co., New York City

Jimmy Lytell (clarinet), Frank Signorelli (piano), Eddie Lang (guitar, banjo)
107225 Old Folks Shuffle - Pathe 36568 (guitar intro, banjo fills, guitar solo, guitar fills)
107226 Red House Blues - Pathe 36568 (guitar solo)
Note: as November 20, 1926; Jazz Records 1897-1942, Brian Rust, Arlington House, 1978.

Irving Kaufman
November 20, 1926
Columbia Record Co., New York City

Vocal with Orchestra poss. including Eddie Lang (banjo)
143127-3 In A Little Spanish Town - Harmony 301-H
143128-2 Tonight You Belong To Me - Harmony 301-H
143129-3 If All The Stars Were Pretty Babies - Harmony 317-H
Note: Presumed to include Lang, this recording session has yet to be auditioned to confirm Eddie Lang’s presence.

Johnny Marvin
November 20, 1926
Columbia Record Co., New York City

Johnny Marvin (ukulele, Hawaiian guitar), Frank Banta (piano), Joe Venuti (guitar?*), Eddie Lang (guitar**)
143130-2 A Little Music In The Moonlight - Columbia 831-D (guitar interlude -4-, accompaniment)*
143131-2 My Lady - Columbia 831-D (guitar accompaniment)**
Note: File card states Joe Venuti-guitar (143130) and Eddie Lang-guitar (143131). Venuti's name is crossed out on file card.
Note: This is a typical small band pop record of the day, and there isn’t anything of interest other than the issue of who plays guitar on the first selection; “A Little Music In The Moonlight”. Venuti was a good guitarist. When he still had guitar chops (in the 1920’s and early 1930’s), he played the Eddie Lang method. Both titles feature the same instrument; most probably the small body guitar Lang was using at the time (see “We Three” and “Five Pennies” photos). The guitar playing on 143131 is much more animated, up front, and contains a classic Lang lick (at 1:24).

Roger Wolfe Kahn and His Orchestra
November 24, 1926
Victor Record Co., New York City

Orchestra including Miff Mole (trombone), Joe Venuti (violin), Eddie Lang (guitar), Tony Colluci (banjo)
36964-2 Tonight You Belong To Me - Victor 20359 (waltz, no banjo, no guitar)
36965-4 Wouldn’t You? - Victor 20379 (Miff Mole trombone solo -16-, Lang obligato -32- (off mic), Venuti/Lang -16- including -2- guitar break)
Note: First Venuti/Lang session with Roger Wolfe Kahn.
Note: Listen for Venuti stomping his foot during solo (36965-4)

Ross Gorman and His Orchestra
Monday, December 7, 1926
Edison Record Co., New York City

Orchestra including Miff Mole (trombone), Eddie Lang (guitar, banjo?), poss. Dick McDonough (banjo)
11279-F You’re Burnin’ Me Up (Turning Me Down) - Edison 51896-R (metal part @ Edison) (solo -32-)
11279-G You’re Burnin’ Me Up (Turning Me Down) - Edison test (exists @ Edison)
11354-B Hawaiian Rose - Edison 51896-L (metal part @ Edison) (solo -16- + -8-)
Source: ARSC Lifetime Achievement Award recipient, and noted Edison authority; Raymond Wile, and Jerry Fabris; audio curator at Edison National Historic Site, West Orange, New Jersey.

Red Nichols and His Five Pennies
December 8, 1926
Brunswick Record Co., New York City

Red Nichols (trumpet), Jimmy Dorsey (clarinet, alto sax), Arthur Schutt (piano), Eddie Lang (guitar), Vic Berton (drums)
20992 Washboard Blues - Brunswick 40608 (break, rhythm, solo -12-)
20993 Washboard Blues - Vocalion 1069 (break, rhythm, solo -12-)
20994 That’s No Bargain - Brunswick 3407-B (rhythm, solo -18-)
20995 That’s No Bargain - Vocalion 1069 (rhythm, solo -18-)
Note: 20994/95 arrangement features an insert; Jimmy Dorsey ‘s stunning (prepared) -32- bar alto sax solo that was a spotlight feature for him on a number of recordings (based upon the “C” section of Tiger Rag).

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Jack Pettis and His Band
ca. December 16, 1926
Banner Record Co., New York City

Orchestra including Joe Venuti (violin), Eddie Lang (guitar)
6996-3 He’s The Last Word - Banner 1911 (break, rhythm, fills during vocal, Venuti solo)
6997-2 St. Louis Shuffle - Banner 1908 (solo, Venuti/Lang -16-, Venuti fill)
6997-3 St. Louis Shuffle - Banner 1908 (solo, Venuti/Lang -16-)
6998-2 Stockholm Stomp - Banner 1907 (rhythm, break, Venuti-four string/Lang -24-, Venuti/Lang -4- + -4- fills)


Few early white jazz players have remained so stubbornly resistant to the efforts of researchers as saxophonist Jack Pettis. Born around 1902 in Danville, Illinois, he first attracted attention as a member of the eight-man New Orleans Rhythm Kings, playing at the Friars' Inn in downtown Chicago's Loop district at the dawn of the 1920s. According to many who heard him in those early years, he was among the first to develop a distinctive “hot” style on C-melody and tenor saxophones, which he played interchangeably with alto. By 1924 he was a member of Ben Bernie's popular band, demonstrating impressive technique and a smoothly-textured approach. His solos on records under Bernie's name, his own, and that of pianist Al Goering, attest to his skill – even if lacking the kind of individuality that ultimately distinguished his contemporary and fellow C-melody specialist, Frank Trumbauer. Personnel on Pettis records for Banner, Victor, and OKeh generally included Goering, brass bassist Merrill Klein, drummer Dillon Ober, and Bill "Jazz" Moore, a trumpeter of mixed racial extraction who worked in the California Ramblers and other white bands, occasionally billed as "the Hot Hawaiian." Pettis left Bernie sometime in 1928, but continued to record, gradually dropping out of sight at decade's end. News items during the '30s mention him only sporadically: the Orin Blackstone’s monthly Popular Music for March 10, 1933, for example, has him fronting a young group at the Hotel Peabody in Memphis, with Dolores Reade, later to become Mrs. Bob Hope, as vocalist. But after that the trail goes cold, and his last years remain a mystery.

Venuti and Lang, riding high on the success of their debut records for OKeh, seem to have been inserted into several Pettis record dates to insure healthy sales. They liven things up on “He's The Last Word”, with most of a full solo chorus and some engaging "fills" during the verse. Pettis and Thomas "Fats" Waller are listed as co-composers of “St. Louis Shuffle”, performed here for the first time on record. Compared with the Fletcher Henderson records of several months later, this reading is a bit stilted, but Joe and Eddie acquit themselves with aplomb, Lang at one point playing a solo break familiar from the Trumbauer-Beiderbecke record of “Riverboat Shuffle”. “Stockholm Stomp” is a Pettis-Goering original, widely used by other bands including Henderson's and the California Ramblers. Though the saxophonist plays fluently in his "alto" register (he may be using an alto saxophone), Venuti takes easy honors with two blues choruses in his "four-string Joe" mode – achieved by unscrewing the "frog," turning his bow upside-down, and holding the horsehairs against all four strings at once, using the left hand to form guitar-like chordal patterns.

Notes by Richard M. Sudhalter from The Classic Columbia And Okeh Joe Venuti And Eddie Lang Sessions, Mosaic MD8-213 (2002). www.mosaicrecords.com

Note: The poor sound quality of these recordings are as a result of Banner being a discount record label that utilized adequate recording equipment, and pressed their 78s from cheap materials.

Red Nichols and His Five Pennies
December 20, 1926
Brunswick Record Co., New York City

Red Nichols (trumpet), Miff Mole (trombone), Jimmy Dorsey (clarinet, alto sax), Arthur Schutt (piano), Eddie Lang (guitar), Vic Berton (drums)
21594 Buddy’s Habit - Brunswick 3477 (accompaniment (alto sax) -4-, -4-, -10-, break)
21597 Boneyard Shuffle -Brunswick 3477 (solo -14-)
21598 Boneyard Shuffle -Vocalion test/re-issue (solo -14-)

Note: Lang’s contributions to these orchestrated small band sides are restricted to either a quick accompaniment (21594), or single string solo (21597/98).

Cleaning Up The Discography - 1926

The following recording sessions have long been thought to include Eddie Lang. Upon auditioning the recordings, Eddie Lang is NOT present on any of these titles.

Roger Wolfe Kahn and His Orchestra
January 13, 1926
Victor Record Co., New York City

34325-3 Looking For The Boy - Victor 19939
34326-2 Song Of The Flame - Victor 19935
Note: No guitar present, Venuti inaudible, Domenic Romeo (banjo)

Roger Wolfe Kahn and His Orchestra
January 25, 1926
Victor Record Co., New York City

34355-4 Baby - Victor 19942-B (banjo chord solo)
34356-4 Lantern Of Love - Victor 19942-A
Note: No guitar present, Venuti inaudible, Domenic Romeo (banjo)

Roger Wolfe Kahn and His Orchestra
March 10, 1926
Victor Record Co., New York City

34692-1,2,3,4 Whistle Away Your Blues - Victor rejected
34693-2 Birdie - Victor 19996
Note: No guitar present, Venuti inaudible, Domenic Romeo (banjo)

Roger Wolfe Kahn and His Orchestra
May 6, 1926
Victor Record Co., New York City

35372-3 At Peace With The World - Victor 20045
35373-2 I’d Climb The Highest Mountain If I Knew I’d Find You - Victor 20045
Note: No guitar present, Venuti inaudible, Domenic Romeo (banjo)

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Roger Wolfe Kahn and His Orchestra
May 13, 1926
Victor Record Co., New York City

35398-1,2,3,4 Cross Your Heart - Victor rejected
35399-4 Somebody’s Lonely - Victor 20059 (banjo break)
35600-3 Raquel Meller (Medley) - Victor 20066 (banjo single string w/ensemble)
Note: No guitar present, Venuti inaudible, Domenic Romeo (banjo)

Roger Wolfe Kahn and His Orchestra
May 27, 1926
Victor Record Co., New York City

35398-7 Cross Your Heart - Victor 20071-B
35633-2 Mountain Greenery - Victor 20071-A
Note: No guitar present, Venuti inaudible, Domenic Romeo (banjo)

Roger Wolfe Kahn and His Orchestra
December 14, 1926
Victor Record Co., New York City

Orchestra including Miff Mole (trombone), Joe Venuti (violin)
37129-2 Tell Me Tonight - Victor 20398 (banjo only)
37132-2 Tenderly Think Of Me - Victor 20398 (banjo only)
Note: No guitar present, Venuti inaudible, Tony Colluci (banjo)

Ross Gorman and His Orchestra
December 16, 1926
Edison Record Co., New York City

11376-A The Sphinx - Edison 51905 (all takes @ Edison)
11376-B The Sphinx - Edison 51905 (all takes @ Edison)
11376-C The Sphinx - Edison 51905 (metal part for take C @ Edison)
11377-A Come Day, Go Day - Edison 51905 (all takes @ Edison/A on ED2094)
11377-B Come Day, Go Day - Edison 51905 (all takes @ Edison/B on ED2095)
11377-C Come Day, Go Day - Edison 51905 (all takes @ Edison/C on ED2095)
Source: ARSC Lifetime Achievement Award recipient, and noted Edison authority; Raymond Wile, and Jerry Fabris; audio curator at Edison National Historic Site, West Orange, New Jersey.
Note: No guitar present, poss. Dick McDonough (banjo)

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1917  |  1919  |  1923  |  1924  |  1925  |  1926  |  1933


Eddie Lang - Sessions - 1933


1933 Sessions

Chick Bullock and His Levee Loungers
January 4, 1933
ARC Record Co., New York City

12798-1 Its Winter Again - Melotone M-12579 (Note: Title not auditioned)
12799-1 Just An Echo In the Valley - Conqueror 8120 (Note: Title not auditioned)
Source: Tommy Dorsey: On The Side, Robert L. Stockdale (Metuchen, NJ, The Scarecrow Press, 1995).
Note: Presumed to include Lang, this recording session has yet to be auditioned to confirm Eddie Lang’s presence. (mp, 2010)

Victor Young and His Orchestra
January 4, 1933
Brunswick Record Co., New York City

12733-C,D Hush-A-Bye, My Baby (Missouri Waltz) - Brunswick 6468 (Note: Title not auditioned)
12734-C,D That Naughty Waltz - Brunswick 6468 (Note: Title not auditioned)
12821- My Wishing Song - Brunswick 6465 (Note: Title not auditioned)
12822- You’re Charming - Brunswick 6465 (Note: Title not auditioned)
Source: Tommy Dorsey: On The Side, Robert L. Stockdale (Metuchen, NJ, The Scarecrow Press, 1995).
Note: Presumed to include Lang, this recording session has yet to be auditioned to confirm Eddie Lang’s presence. (mp, 2010)

Bing Crosby
January 9, 1933
Brunswick Record Co., New York City

12756-A I'm Playing With Fire - Brunswick 6480 (Lang rhythm)
12757-A Try A Little Tenderness - Brunswick 6480 (Lang rhythm, vocal accompaniment)
12757-B Try A Little Tenderness - Brunswick test pressing (Lang rhythm, vocal accompaniment)

Connie Boswell
January 9, 1933
Brunswick Record Co., New York City

12858-A It’s My Fault - Brunswick 6483 (Note: Title not auditioned)
12859-A Underneath The Arches - Brunswick 6483 (Note: Title not auditioned)

The Boswell Sisters
January 9, 1933
Brunswick Record Co., New York City

12860-A Mood Indigo - Brunswick 6470 (Lang rhythm, vocal accompaniment)
12860-B Mood Indigo - Brunswick rejected/reissue (Lang rhythm, vocal accompaniment)

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Frances Williams
January 10, 1933
Columbia Record Co., New York City

265029-2 Underneath The Harlem Moon - Columbia test pressing (Lang rhythm, violin solo)
265030-2 Try A Little Tenderness - Columbia test pressing (Lang accompaniment, Venuti -16-)
265031-2 Hey! Young Fella - Columbia test pressing (Lang rhythm, Venuti in ensemble)
An unissued session recorded for English Columbia, featuring an ad-lib small band session with Miss Frances Williams. Williams is best remembered for having apparently been the first to perform the "Charleston" on Broadway in one of the early editions of “George White’s Scandals." She also appeared in the Marx Brothers 1926 show “The Cocoanuts,” and introduced the song “As Time Goes By” in the 1932 show “Everybody’s Welcome.” This 1933 session finds Williams having some pitch problems, and sounding husky probably due to the chosen keys, Venuti’s 16 bars on “Try A Little Tenderness” highlight his gorgeous tone, and Lang’s guitar comes across crystal clear, too bad he didn’t play a larger role. (mp, 2010)

Johnny Marvin
January 25, 1933
ARC Record Co., New York City

12981 Rock-a-Bye Moon - Melotone M-12610 (Note: Title not auditioned)
12982 I’m Playing With Fire - Melotone M-12610 (Note: Title not auditioned)
Note: Presumed to include Lang, this recording session has yet to be auditioned to confirm Eddie Lang’s presence.(mp, 2010)

Annette Hanshaw
January 25, 1933
ARC Record Co., New York City

12983-1 Moon Song (That Wasn't Meant For Me) - Melotone M-12604 (Lang rhythm, accompaniment)
12984-1 Twenty Million People - Melotone M-12604 (Note: Title not auditioned)
Orchestrated small band sides, the addition of strings giving the illusion of it being a larger ensemble. Lang, not as close as he should be to the microphone, offers arpeggiated chordal accompaniment and rhythm. (mp, 2010)

Paul Small
February 3, 1933
Columbia Record Co., New York City

265032-1, 2 I'm Playing With Fire - Columbia rejected
265033-2 My Darling - Columbia E DB 1091 (Note: Title not auditioned)
265034-2 There’s A House On The Hill - Columbia E DB 1091 (Note: Title not auditioned)
265035-2 The Sidewalk Waltz - Columbia E DB1096 (Lang guitar accompaniment, violin obligato)
Venuti provides violin obligato and lead melody line. Lang, seated close to the microphone, offers prominent guitar accompaniment. (mp, 2010)

Bing Crosby - Kate Smith
ARC Brunswick Studio Band
February 9, 1933
Brunswick Record Co., New York City

Bing Crosby (vocal-1), Kate Smith (vocal-2), orchestra including Tommy Dorsey (trombone), Eddie Lang (guitar).
13041-1 Any Time, Any Day, Anywhere - Melotone M-12626 Note: Title not auditioned
13042-1 I've Got The World On A String - Melotone M-12626 Note: Title not auditioned
13043-A What Do I Care, It’s Home - Brunswick 6515 (Lang rhythm, TD trombone -16-) (1)
13043-B What Do I Care, It’s Home - Brunswick rejected/re-issue (Lang rhythm, TD trombone -16-) (1)
13044-A You’ve Got Me Crying Again - Brunswick 6515 (Lang rhythm, Lang fills behind clarinet -4-) (1)
Lunch Break
13045-A Pickaninnie’s Heaven - Brunswick 6497 (2) (Note: Title not auditioned)
13046-A Twenty Million People - Brunswick 6496 (Lang rhythm) (2)
13047-A My Queen Of Lullaby - Brunswick 6496 (Lang rhythm) (2)
13048-A Moon Song (That Wasn't Meant For Me) - Brunswick 6497 (Lang inaudible) (2)
E717 Night And Day - ARC Theater Use (Note: Title not auditioned)
E718 I Wake Up Smiling - ARC Theater Use (Note: Title not auditioned)
E719 Hey! Young Fella - ARC Theater Use (Note: Title not auditioned)
Note: There is the possibility that Lang left (with Crosby) at the conclusion of the morning session and an unidentified guitarist is heard during the afternoon session. (mp, 2010)

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Gertrude Niesen
February 9, 1933
Columbia Record Co., New York City

152376-2 You’re Mine You – Columbia 2759 (Note: Title not auditioned)
152377-2 Tonys Wife – Columbia 2759 (Note: Title not auditioned)
Note: Presumed to include Lang, this recording session has yet to be auditioned to confirm Eddie Lang’s presence.(mp,2010)

Adrian Rollini and His Orchestra
February 14, 1933
ARC Record Co., New York City

13049-1 Have You Ever Been Lonely? - Melotone M-12629 (Note: Title not auditioned)
13050-1 You’ve Got Me Crying Again - Banner 32699 (Lang rhythm)
13051-1 Hustlin’ And Bustlin’ For My Baby - Banner 32699 (Lang rhythm)
13052-1 You Must Believe In Me - Melotone M-12629 (Note: Title not auditioned)
Venuti can be heard on 13050 in the opening and leading the ensemble, and on 13051 behind the vocal and an eight bar solo. Lang, with fairly good microphone position, is heard providing rhythm on these dance band sides. (mp, 2010)

Frances Langford
February 16, 1933
Columbia Record Co., New York City

265053-1 Stormy Weather - Columbia E DB 1124 (Lang rhythm)
265054-1 You’re Hi-De-Hi-ing Me - Columbia E DB 1124 (Lang rhythm)

Joe Venuti - Eddie Lang Blue Five - 1
Joe Venuti And His Blue Five - 2
February 28, 1933
Columbia Record Co., New York City

265066-2 Raggin' The Scale - Columbia 2765-D (Lang rhythm, accompaniment) -1
265067-2 Hey! Young Fella - Columbia (E) CB 601 (Lang rhythm, accompaniment) -1
265068-2 Jig Saw Puzzle Blues - Columbia 2782-D (Lang rhythm, -12- solo, banjo style rhythm tremolos) -2
265069-2 Pink Elephants - Columbia (E) CB 601 (Lang rhythm, accompaniment) -2
Source: The Classic Columbia and Okeh Joe Venuti and Eddie Lang Sessions, Mosaic MD8-213, (2002). www.mosaicrecords.com
For what would be the final Venuti-Lang recording session, Joe and Eddie brought together two of the greatest instrumentalists of the previous decade. Both Jimmy Dorsey and Adrian Rollini had contributed stunning performances on several earlier Blue Four dates, but they had never recorded together under Joe and Eddie’s leadership until now. The result produced fireworks. It is arguably their greatest session as an ensemble and with it Venuti and Lang perfected their concept of interpreting jazz with a wind and string ensemble. Each three-minute side is a study in small group arranging, interpretation, and collective and individual performance. They use every element of the Venuti-Lang small group formula to perfection. The repertoire has them taking a look back while also making strides forward as they gloriously rearrange two current pop songs, reinvent one classic, and concoct a last minute original.
Joe and Eddie had already recorded "Raggin’ The Scale" in 1930 with a quartet that included Rollini. Three years later, expanded to a quintet, they produced a masterpiece. (Of note; the final sixteen bars has Joe and Jimmy going at it together over the pulsating rhythm section. Perfection!). When Venuti heard Dorsey’s clarinet play the opening strains of "Hey! Young Fella" in 1977 (having last heard the record some four decades earlier) he bellowed out the songs title and said “I got fifty potatoes (dollars) for recording that.” He then sat listening in silence as the record played on, obviously satisfied with the results. (That’s Joe playing bass for the first chorus behind Rollini’s vibes).
Fans of the pop group “Fleetwood Mac” may recognize the title "Jig Saw Puzzle Blues". In 1968, Mac guitarist Danny Kirwan swiped parts of Jimmy Dorsey’s clarinet solo and built a song around it. The 1933 original recording features twelve bars of single string guitar that starts out bluesy but ends in a stream of notes.


Jig Saw Puzzle Blues | mp3 | 812KB

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When it came to showing off ones chops, few could compete with Jimmy Dorsey. A master of the reeds, and a very good cornet player, Dorsey struts his stuff on "Pink Elephants". By the introduction you can appreciate the depth at which these musicians related to each other as they seamlessly set up the song by trading one bar phrases. Few did it better. (mp, 2002)
Notes by Mike Peters from The Classic Columbia And Okeh Joe Venuti And Eddie Lang Sessions, Mosaic MD8-213 (2002).www.mosaicrecords.com
Note: see “Cleaning Up The Discography 1933” for more about this session.

Ruth Etting
March 1, 1933
ARC Record Co., New York City

13105- How Can I Go On Without You - Banner 32714 (Lang accompaniment, rhythm)
13106- Linger A Little Longer In The Twilight - Banner 32714 (Lang accompaniment, rhythm)
Orchestrated small band sides highlighting piano accompaniment, sub-tone clarinet and muted trumpet. Venuti’s role is minimal. Lang, not as close as he should be to the microphone, offers arpeggiated chordal accompaniment and rhythm. (mp, 2010)

Chick Bullock and His Levee Loungers
March 7, 1933
ARC Record Co., New York City

13120-1 Going! Going! Gone!!! - Banner 32716 (Lang rhythm, banjo style rhythm tremolos)
13121-1 Low Down Upon The Harlem River - Banner 32716 (Lang rhythm)
Source: The Complete Brunswick, Parlophone and Vocalion Bunny Berigan Sessions, MD7-219, Mosaic Records (2003) www.mosaicrecords.com
Note: The guitarist on this session may be Dick McDonough. (mp, 2010)

Lee Wiley
March 7, 1933
ARC Record Co., New York City

13122-1 You've Got Me Crying Again - Epic BSN 159 (LP) (Lang rhythm)
13122-2 You've Got Me Crying Again - Meritt 501 (LP) (Lang rhythm)
13123-1 I Gotta Right To Sing The Blues - Jass 19 (LP) (Lang rhythm)
13123-2 I Gotta Right To Sing The Blues - Epic L2N 6072 (LP) (Lang rhythm)
Source: The Complete Brunswick, Parlophone and Vocalion Bunny Berigan Sessions, MD7-219, Mosaic Records (2003) www.mosaicrecords.com
Note: The guitarist on this session may be Dick McDonough. (mp, 2010)

Bing Crosby
March 8, 1933
Radio Broadcast: Bing Crosby, Chesterfield Time/Chesterfield Cigarettes Presents “Music That Satisfies”
CBS Network over WABC, NYC, 9:00-9:15 pm (EST)

Bing Crosby (vocal), Lennie Hayton Orchestra, including Eddie Lang (guitar).
Announced by Norman Brokenshire
Shuffle Off To Buffalo - Bing Crosby
Try A Little Tenderness - Bing Crosby
Unidentified song from Earl Carroll’s Vanities (Instrumental) - Lennie Hayton Orchestra
More Than You Know - Bing Crosby
I’ve Gotta Right To Sing The Blues (Instrumental) - Lennie Hayton Orchestra
Theme: Just An Echo In The Valley
“Bing Crosby who got his name as an Injun scout in his Tacoma backyard, will introduce a new song entitled, ‘Shuffle Off To Buffalo’ as a feature of his program with Norman Brokenshire. Bing will also sing, ‘Try A Little Tenderness’ and ‘More Than You Know’ while Leonard Hayton strikes up the band in ‘I Gotta Right To Sing The Blues’ (WJSV 9 pm).” (The Washington Post, March 8, 1933)

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Bing Crosby
March 15, 1933 (Wed)
Radio Broadcast: Bing Crosby, Chesterfield Time/Chesterfield Cigarettes Presents “Music That Satisfies”
CBS Network over WABC, NYC, 9:00-9:15 pm (EST)

Bing Crosby (vocal), Lennie Hayton Orchestra, including Eddie Lang (guitar).
Announced by Norman Brokenshire
There’s Nothing Left To Do But Say ‘Goodbye’ - Bing Crosby
It Don’t Mean a Thing (If It Ain’t Got That Swing) (Instrumental) - Lennie Hayton Orchestra
Farewell To Arms - Bing Crosby
What Do I Care, It’s Home (Instrumental) - Lennie Hayton Orchestra
You’re Beautiful Tonight, My Dear - Bing Crosby
Theme: Just An Echo In The Valley - Bing Crosby
“Bing goes collegiate - The radio star pilgrimage to Hollywood proceeds with Bing Crosby slated to arrive here on April 1st to appear in ‘College Humor’ in which Buster Crabbe and Randolph Scott are other possibilities. The film is to show Bing as a very, very collegiate.” (Los Angeles Times, March 18, 1933)

Greta Keller
March 22, 1933
Brunswick Record Co., New York City

13168-A Maybe I Love You Too Much - Brunswick 6544 (Note: Title not auditioned)
13169-A I Wake Up Smiling - Decca F-3586 (Lang rhythm, arpeggios)
13170-A Lover - Brunswick 6544 (Note: Title not auditioned)

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Bing Crosby
March 25, 1933
Radio Broadcast: Bing Crosby, Chesterfield Time/Chesterfield Cigarettes Presents “Music That Satisfies”
CBS Network over WABC, NYC, 9:00-9:15 pm (EST)

Bing Crosby (vocal), Lennie Hayton Orchestra, including Eddie Lang (guitar), Tommy Dorsey (trombone), Jimmy Dorsey (clarinet).
Announced by Norman Brokenshire
Opening Theme: Where The Blue Of The Night
Norman Brokenshire: “How do you do ladies and gentlemen, how do you do. Lets forget all about the week just passed. Lets begin a happy weekend, its Chesterfield Time!”
You Are Too Beautiful - Bing Crosby -8- (Lang accompaniment)
Norman Brokenshire: “How do you do ladies and gentlemen, how do you do. Lets forget all about the week just past. Lets begin a happy weekend, its Chesterfield Time!”
What Do I Care, It’s Home - Bing Crosby (Lang accompaniment, rhythm, TD trombone (muted) -16-)
Norman Brokenshire (Chesterfield commercial): “After all is said and done, when you smoke a cigarette, you smoke it because you like it. Now people like Chesterfields because they’re milder, they taste better. People like Chesterfields because they’re seasoned with just enough aromatic taste. People like Chesterfields because they’re well made, just right for smoking. People smoke Chesterfields because they’ve got what it takes to satisfy.”
Tonys Wife (Instrumental) - Lennie Hayton Orchestra (Lang rhythm, JD clarinet fills -32-, piano -16-, JD clarinet -32-,-2-,-2-)
Norman Brokenshire: “Yes sir, that was Tonys Wife, I mean Tonys Wife was the title of that rumbling rhumba. Thank you very much Lennie.”
Norman Brokenshire: “Say Bing, how in the world are you gonna change that mood?”
Bing Crosby: “Well just this way Norman. I have what I consider a very lovely song called, You Are Too Beautiful.”
You Are Too Beautiful - Bing Crosby (piano accompanies Bing for opening verse, Lang accompaniment, fills, rhythm)
Norman Brokenshire (Chesterfield commercial): “You like mildness, better taste and aroma in your cigarettes, don’t ya? You like ‘em rolled firm, don’t ya? Then I think you’ll like Chesterfields. Try them.”
Moon Song (That Wasn’t Meant For Me) - Bing Crosby (Lang accompaniment, fills, rhythm)
Bing Crosby: “And so ladies and gentleman with Moon Song, my program is over. All that’s left is just”
Closing Theme: Just An Echo In The Valley - Bing Crosby -12- (Lang accompaniment, fills)
Norman Brokenshire (over Crosby whistling with orchestra -4-): “Next week we begin with Ruth Etting. See you Monday at Chesterfield Time, this is Norman Brokenshire.”
Station announcer: “This is the Columbia Broadcasting System.”
Just An Echo In The Valley (continues) - Bing Crosby whistling with orchestra.
Station announcer: “WABC, or W2XE, New York.”
Note: Lang is extremely fluent during the closing theme: Just An Echo In The Valley.
On this March 25th radio broadcast, Eddie Lang’s final session, his role is consistent with the musical services he provided Crosby during his sixteen month tenure as accompanist and confidant; guiding accompaniment, decorative fills, and steady rhythm. He would enter Park West Hospital the next day for what was to be a routine tonsillectomy, but tragically died while still in recovery. That this broadcast was recorded (for conductor Lennie Hayton) and preserved is surely a stroke of luck. Typical of the day it is heavy on pop songs, scripted banter, with very little jazz content. Crosby dominates the proceedings with his naturally cool, and very hip (for the time) singing style. With a starring role in a full length motion picture already under his belt, a successful weekly radio show, and hit records on the charts, Crosby’s “day” was about to arrive. “During his most prominent years, from 1934 to 1954, Crosby held a nearly unrivaled command over all three key entertainment media, racking up legendary phonograph sales, radio ratings, and motion picture grosses.” (Gary Giddins: Bing Crosby, A Pocketful Of Dreams, The Early Years, 1903-1940; Little, Brown and Company, 2001). Sadly, Lang was not to share in Crosby’s rise to national icon.
Ten years earlier, Eddie Lang made his first appearance on record. Over the course of a decade he brought the guitar to national prominence displaying a powerful style of creative accompaniment that utilized modern harmonies, balanced with a unique sense of rhythm. That he could creatively solo at a moments notice only further spotlighted the instruments possibilities, and his immense talents. By the late nineteen twenties, Lang had redefined the role of the guitar in pop and jazz, dramatically expanding its harmonic, rhythmic and solo capabilities. Singlehandedly he ushered the instrument into the modern age, forever changing the way the guitar would be played, heard, and utilized. Literally writing the book on how to play guitar in the 20th century, Eddie Lang has influenced every pop, jazz, rock, blues, and country guitarist by his innovations, though few today recognize it and even fewer are aware of his lasting contribution(s). (mp, 2010)

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Cleaning Up The Discography - 1933


The following recording sessions have long been thought to include Eddie Lang. Upon auditioning the recordings, Eddie Lang is NOT present on any of these titles.

Guy Lombardo And His Royal Canadians
New York City, January 12, 1933

Bing Crosby* (vocal), Carmen Lombardo** (vocal), orchestra including Lombardo guitarist Francis Henry (guitar).
12887-A You’re Getting To Be A Habit With Me* - Br 6472
12887-B You’re Getting To Be A Habit With Me* - Br rejected/reissue
12888-A Young And Healthy* - Br 6472
12888-B Young And Healthy* - Br 6472
12889-A You’re Beautiful Tonight My Dear* - Br 6477
12889-B You’re Beautiful Tonight My Dear* - Br rejected/reissue
12890- I’m Playing With Fire** - Br 6477
Note: Eddie Lang does not appear on this session. (mp, 2010)

Victor Young And His Orchestra
New York City, January 21, 1933

12962-A Hebrew Chant - Br 6501
12963-A Where Have We Met Before? - Br 6484
12964- You’re An Old Smoothie - Br 4684
TO 1251 I’ll Leave These Reminders For You
Eddie Lang does not appear on this session. Joe Venuti (violin), if present, is inaudible. (mp, 2010)

Bing Crosby
New York City, January 26, 1933

Bing Crosby (vocal), ARC Brunswick Orchestra directed by Lennie Hayton, Bunny Berigan (trumpet), Tommy Dorsey (trombone), Benny Goodman (clarinet), Harry Hoffman (violin), Fulton McGrath (piano), Dick McDonough (guitar), Arthur Bernstein (bass), Stan King (drums), Mills Brothers (vocal).*
12991-A I've Got The World On A String - Br 6491
12991-B I've Got The World On A String - Br rejected/reissue
12992-A My Honey’s Lovin’ Arms* - Br 6525
12992-B My Honey’s Lovin’ Arms* - Br 6525
Eddie Lang does not appear on this session. (mp, 2010)

Joe Venuti and Eddie Lang’s Blue Five
New York City, February 28, 1933

Jimmy Dorsey (alto sax, clarinet, trumpet), Adrian Rollini (bass sax, goofus, hot fountain pen, vibraphone), Joe Venuti (violin, bass), Eddie Lang (guitar), Phil Wall (piano).
265066-1 Raggin' The Scale - Col rejected test pressing
265067-1 Hey! Young Fella - Col rejected/re issue Yazoo 1062*
265068-1 Jig Saw Puzzle Blues - Col rejected/re issue Yazoo 1062*
265069-1 Pink Elephants - Col rejected test pressing
Source: Joe Venuti: Violin Jazz 1927-1934,Yazoo 1062*
There is no supporting aural evidence to prove these are rejected Columbia titles. The two selections found on Yazoo 1062 (265067 & 265068) are identical to the issued titles. Test pressings are not known to exist for these or any of the so-called rejected titles from this session. (mp, 2010)

COMMENTS

mp=Mike Peters

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